Only when documentation has been found are specific tribal names given

Basswood (Tilia americana L.) used by Algonquin, Cherokee, Chippewa/Ojibwe, Lakota, Menominee, Meskwaki, Potowatomi

inner bark used as cordage, for tying/binding, sewing, weaving, making mats, fishnets, snowshoes

 

 Bulrush (Scirpus validus Vahl.) used by Menominee, Ojibwe, Potawatomi

woven into mats to use on floors or as walls; also woven into baskets

Cattail (Typha latifolia) used by Menominee, Ojibwe, Potawatomi

leaves made into mats to cover winter lodges; used to make rope and baskets, 

Cattail roots and shoots, harvested Spring of 2012 

 

 Cedar or Arbor-vitae (Thuja occidentalis L.) used by Menominee, Ojibwe

bark woven into bags

 Dogbane ((Apocynum androsaemifolium L.) used by Menominee, Ojibwe, Potawatomi

fibers used as thread and cordage; fibres woven into a durable fabric

 
 

Jack Pine (Pinus banksiana) used by Menominee, Ojibwe, Potawatomi

roots used as cordage after boiling and splitting, usually for sewing birch bark canoes

Leatherweed or Moosewood (Dirca palustris) used by Menominee, Ojibwe, Potawatomi

bark used as cordage, good substitute for twine

 

 Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca L.) used by Menominee, Ojibwe, Potawatomi

thread, cords for fishnets

 

 Nettle (Urticaceae gracilis and Laportea canadensis)  used by Menominee, Ojibwe, Potawatomi

after retting, fibers made into a twine for making fiber bags; also used as thread

 Slippery Elm (Ulmus fulva Mx.) used by Menominee, Ojibwe, Potawatomi

bark boiled and uses for fiber for making bags and storage baskets

 
 

Sweet Grass (Hierochloe odorata) 

a sacred smudging herb, it was also used for making baskets

 Tamarack (Larix laricinia)  used by Chippewa/Ojibwe

roots used for weaving bags, sewing edges of canoes

 
 

 Thistle